Natural World

How our day to day lives are intrinsically linked to the health of the natural world.

Since the dawn of time, nature has formed the basis for life on earth. The natural cycles of the earth are so perfectly balanced that one species’ waste product is another’s resource and so life on earth has been maintained in equilibrium for thousands of years. It’s no secret that human intervention has upset this balance and that we use far more and at a far greater pace than the earth is able to replace. It’s also no secret that as a species we are becoming more and more disconnected from nature and spending less and less time in its company. I spend time wondering then, if these two things are related; That many people have little or no awareness of the intrinsic link between our day to day technology driven lives and nature itself.  It’s easy to consider people’s lack of environmental action as driven by malice or malevolence but have we considered that it could be the product of unfamiliarity and ignorance?

This a blog, not for the environmentally conscientious but for the ambivalent. For those people who (perhaps fairly) ask the question “In this modern world, full of technology and convenience, how am I connected to nature?” The answers are many, these points are only few, but this blog is to help people consider how our existence as a species is tied inextricably to nature and how, put simply, ambivalence about its conservation needs resolution.

Food

Perhaps the most obvious. All our food comes from nature or our manipulation of it. From large and small-scale farming to growing fruit and vegetables on our own allotments to foraging our forests and coast lines. Nature provides us with one resource we quite simply cannot live without; food.

Water

If you’ve ever lived in a country like Australia or Africa or seen, on the news, the plight of the many millions of people in the world living in drought, then you have seen the devastating effects of water shortage. We can only live an average of three days without water and where do we get our water? Nature.

Economy

Natural capital can be defined as the world’s stocks of natural assets which include geology, soil, air, water and all living things. It is from this natural capital that humans derive a wide range of services, often called ecosystem services, which make human life possible.

The most obvious ecosystem services include the food we eat, the water we drink and the plant materials we use for fuel, building materials and medicines. There are also many less visible ecosystem services such as the climate regulation and natural flood defences provided by forests, the billions of tonnes of carbon stored by peatlands, or the pollination of crops by insects (NCF, 2018).

In 2014 the journal of Global Environmental Change revealed that the total value of the World’s ecosystem services amounted to twice as much as global aggregate GDP – as much as $124.8 trillion per year.

Medicines

Throughout history, humans have used plants to treat all kinds of illness and disease. To this day a huge proportion of our modern medicines are derived originally from plants. Just two examples are Aspirin where the key ingredient comes from Willow Bark and Morphine which is derived from the Opium Poppy. Rather than a move to greater use of synthetic drugs, there is actually an increasing demand for medicines derived from more natural and environmentally friendly sources. There is a hope that increasing research into this area can develop new drugs that have more effectiveness and fewer side effects than most modern drugs. Here’s a paper worth reading on the subject.

Nature gives us the power to heal, to treat, to prolong life and to reduce suffering through modern medicine.

Wider health

There is a quickly growing body of evidence demonstrating the links between nature and health (this is our specialist area here at Studio 31). There’s evidence to suggest that we heal more quickly, get sick less and have improved mental health by being in regular contact with nature. Moreover, nature facilitates some of the most common ways of exercising; walking, hiking, running and cycling to name but a few. When we design for health we facilitate people to be able to interact with nature and therefore contribute to improved health, concentration, happiness and fitness.

Play

You’ve probably heard the term “Nature Deficit Disorder” coined by Richard Louv in his 2005 book Last Child in the Woods. He argues that all of us, especially children, are spending more time indoors, which makes us feel alienated from nature and perhaps more vulnerable to negative moods or reduced attention span (Louv, 2009) The emergence of natural play spaces, den building, forest schools and garden classrooms are just some of the strategies being used to combat this disassociation with nature and help our children to thrive physically, socially, academically and emotionally.

Conclusion

Almost everything we do, eat, wear or touch in our day to day lives either currently does or once had a connection to the natural world. Nature meets almost all of our basic needs; food, water, shelter, health, and happiness and whether you love or loathe its company, the truth is, our very existence depends on the health and survival of the natural world.

Perhaps then, with the growth in education about the natural world sparked by programmes like the Blue Planet and gaining momentum through industrious individuals and organisations, we can begin to transform ambivalence into action and doubt into hope.

 

 

 

References

NCF (2018) https://naturalcapitalforum.com/about/ Accessed 21st June 2018.

Louv (2009) https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/people-in-nature/200901/no-more-nature-deficit-disorder Accessed 21st June 2018

 

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